The art of self care.

There’s an art to living well.

Life is an art all on its own – it is an array of colors and forms and movement and music and beauty and tragedy and comedy, all rolled into one.

Personally, there’s an art to finding the balance of being a good dad and a Dad who builds structure and form into his kids life.

Professionally, there’s an art to follow up. There’s an Art of the Deal (sorry not sorry for including that haha!  It’s a marvelous book actually).

As someone who lives day to day with a mental illness, there’s an art to daily living   There’s an art to balancing the mental capacity required to function and taking time for myself.  There’s an art form in balancing the hatred of the medicines and their bad side effects, and then acknowledging the real results of taking them.   There’s also an art form in taking the time to care for yourself.

Self care is the art of taking time for you.

From LDS.org/mentalhealth:  “Practice self-care. Consider making a change in your daily routine or establishing a deliberate habit. Seek pleasure in small and simple things by noticing the texture of a flower, the flavor of a favorite food, or the beauty of a birdsong. Practice mindfulness or another relaxation technique. Allow your thoughts to turn to God as you give your mind and body time to rejuvenate.”

I’ve started walking in the mornings several days a week, and one of my favorite parts had been taking the time to smell the flowers on the path I walk.  It seems odd to get so much relief out of such a small thing but I am tell you – it’s awesome.

As you all have seen the last few posts, I’ve kind been in a ruttier rut than usual.  It’s been interesting to see the difference though that comes as I’ve tried to make time to take time for me.  One of my favorite quotes from recent reading says:

“Old sailing ships had periods when the wind did not blow. They were ‘dead in the water.’ But the wind will return. The sails will fill. You will come into port.”

Thinking about that concept, the idea of filling the sails is interesting.  Given the realities of what I suffer with – manic depression – there will be winds in empty sails at some point.  They may end up being gale force winds, but winds in the sails nonetheless.

The point of what I’m trying to say though, is that we can fill the sails on our own.   Self care is one of many ways to help calm the rough seas of mental illness.    I am becoming an ever stronger believer in the value of self care and what it brings to me mentally and physically.

Heres to rejuvenation and a solid path to recovery.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: